November 1, 2014

Saganing Eagles Landing Casino to expand

Posted

STANDISH TWP. — The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe has announced plans to expand the Saganing Eagles Landing Casino, which is tentatively planned to add hotel rooms, table games, and dining options.

Tribal spokesman Frank Cloutier said the plans were still being finalized, but the tribe is anticipating about 150-155 hotel rooms, a diner built to resemble the 1950s-style Legends Diner at the Mount Pleasant Soaring Eagle Casino, and games like roulette, blackjack and craps. The expansion is planned for the west side of the current building, where the employee parking lot is currently located.

“I think it’s going to have a rather significant impact,” Cloutier said. “There’s a gaming market to be enjoyed in that area, and we think with the casino expansion, the dining option and table games with a place for people to stay, people will stay in the area longer and enjoy more of the community.”

“When you look at what we do in Mount Pleasant, no one says that all the business stays under our roof. (People) stay in the area and go to other local businesses,” he added.

Work on the expansion is expected to begin within months, Cloutier said, and is expected to generate about 251 part- and full-time jobs. The casino will remain open during the construction period, he said.

“We are hoping to turn soil on this modest addition between April and May of this year, with an expected completion date of early spring 2014,” Tribal Chief Dennis Kequom said in a statement.

Cloutier said the expansion is something the tribe has been looking at for about a year and a half, but a linchpin that needed to fall into place first was water and sewer. Before the completion of a water treatment plant on the tribe’s land, the casino lacked municipal services, which limited any expansion. With the plant complete, the tribal council voted on Jan. 15 to approve the expansion plan.

Cloutier also noted that the expansion should have a positive impact on the two-percent gaming revenue grants the tribe gives to local municipalities and school districts twice a year, as the amounts are based on the revenue the casino brings in.

“The more gaming revenue we can capture, the more two-percent revenue we can share with local governments and public schools,” he said. “I think this will be very positive for the entire region.”

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